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Event Schedule

Laurie Ness teaches knitting in 2012.Marty DeWitt Storyteller and Musician. Photo provided by Craig Grantz in 2012Living History Society of Minnesota's Tea Program. Photo provided by Craig Grantz in 2012.

Ticket Window opens at 8:00 am both days

Grounds are closed between 4:30 and 7pm on Saturday and after 4 pm on Sunday

 

 
Download the Tentative Schedule for 2018.
 
 
2018 Events
 
Saturday August 11
Sunday, August 12
All Day
events
Children’s Games at the Mercantile
Gun Display at Hiawatha Lodge
All Day
events
Children’s Games at the Mercantile
Gun Display at Hiawatha Lodge
8:00 am
 
8:00 am
 
9:00 am
 
9:00 am
9:15 am
Songs, Tales and the War
A Child’s Life in the War
9:15 am
Child’s life in the Civil War
Songs, Tales and the War
9:30 am
9:30 am
Lincoln inspects the Troops in Federal Camp
9:45 am
Lincoln inspects the Troops Federal Camp
9:45 am
Life of a Confederate Soldier
The Daily Life of Women
10:00 am
10:00 am
Abe Lincoln - Emancipation
10:15 am
Women Soldiers
Lincoln Confers with Grant in Federal Camp
10:15 am
10:30 am
10:30 am
Lincoln Confers with Grant in Federal Camp
10:45 am
10:45 am
Women Soldiers
Baseball Game on battlefield
11:00 am
Lincoln on Gettysburg
Life of a Confederate Soldier
The Daily Life of Women
Baseball Game on Battlefield
11:00 am
11:15 am
Jesse Moffitt Magic Show
11:15 am
Songs, Tales and the War
Cannon Demonstration in Union camp
11:30 am
11:30 am
Jesse Moffitt Magic Show
11:45 am
Life of a Union Soldier
Cannon Demonstration in Confederate camp
11:45 am
Life of a Union Soldier
12:00 pm
Songs, Tales and the War
12:00 pm
12:30 pm
Jesse Moffitt Magic Show
Baseball Game on Battlefield
12:30 pm
Child’s life in the Civil War
12:45 pm
12:45 pm
Jesse Moffitt Magic Show
1:00 pm
Lincoln - Mankato Trial
Children in the War
1:00 pm
Band Concert
1:15 pm
The Daily Life of Women

1:15 pm

1:30 pm
Jesse Moffitt Magic Show
Baseball Game on battlefield

1:30 pm

2:00 pm
Band Concert
2:00 pm
BATTLE
3:00 pm
BATTLE
3:00 pm
Songs, Tales and the War
Women Soldiers
4:00 pm
Songs, Tales and the War
4:00 pm
Grounds Closed to the Public

4:30 pm

Grounds Closed to the Public

5:30 pm
At the Performing Arts Center
 
 
7:15 pm
Dance Lessons at Hiawatha Lodge
 
 
8-10 pm
GRAND BALL at Hiawatha Lodge
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Special Guests
Gun exhibit of Moss Ellis
"Doctor" Dan Wright
Timeworn Tunesters
Ladies Aid Society
 
 
 
Program Information
 
A Weekend with the President
Abraham Lincoln was president at a pivotal time in American history. While the Union was divided, he made crucial decisions which still impact our nation today. And this weekend, President. Lincoln is making a special visit to Pipestone. During the weekend the President will be reviewing the troops, discussing the causes and effects of the Civil War with General Grant, assessing the battle of Gettysburg, and discussing topics of his presidency. If asked, the President will tell you about growing up in a log cabin, how he got his beard, and why he wears such a tall hat. He stresses the importance of getting a good education, having respect for the law, and never giving up on oneself. Do not miss this rare opportunity to talk to President Lincoln. Lincoln is portrayed by Fritz Klein, actor and speaker who appeared most recently in Legends and Lies, a TV miniseries on the Civil War.
Lincoln, the Last Full Measure (at the Pipestone Performing Arts Center) Fritz Klein, one of the nation's best known Lincoln reenactors who has appeared in movies, television programs and on stage, presents Lincoln between the gun shot at Ford’s Theater and his last breath. He will review his life, the war and his hopes for the future. This memorable event will be at the Pipestone Performing Arts Center Saturday, August 11th at 5:30pm. Tickets are $4 per seat and can be purchased by calling the Pipestone County Museum at 507-825-2563.
 
Lincoln and His Cabinet The President will discuss how he picked his cabinet. Three of the members had run against him for the Republican nomination for presidency. He put together a team of 1his rivals to ensure he had best individuals to serve the country during the war.
 
 
The Artillery
You won’t want to miss the cannon demonstrations. Each day one of the camps will present a cannon demonstration. The Minnesota 2nd Regiment was a group of citizen soldiers who went off to war to represent Minnesota in the War Between the States. Learn how the cannons were used in battle and about the lives of the artillery soldiers during the War.
 
 
Ballroom Dancing
Ever wanted to know how to do the Virginia reel, or the Schottische? The Minnesota Living History Society is offering free ballroom dance lessons at the Lodge on Saturday evening at 7:15 pm. Don’t have a partner? They will provide a partner and the skills to dance like the gentry at the Grand Ball at the Hiawatha Lodge on the grounds at 8:00 pm.
 
 
The Grand Ball at the Hiawatha Lodge
If you can walk, you can dance at the Grand Ball! The public is invited to the Hiawatha Lodge, located North of the battle field, at 8 pm on Saturday for an evening of dancing. Come see the reenactors in their Sunday best and if the mood strikes you, feel free to join in the dancing. The 5th Regimental Band will play and a caller will give instructions for the different dances of the 1860s. All are welcome to join us for a free evening of entertainment.
 
 
Blacksmith
Visit out Blacksmith and learn the important role blacksmiths played during the 1860's. Watch as our blacksmith molds metal into implements available for purchase to the public.
 
 

1860’s Baseball Game

The Pipestone Civil War Days will be featuring a vintage baseball game played by the rules which were enacted prior to the beginning of the Civil War. The Quicksteps will be competing against the Henderson’s and Westerns Saturday on the battlefield.
 
 
The Battle
You will be able to witness the battle as the citizens of Washington D.C. did on the first major encounter of the Civil War. The North and South will be reenacting a battle from 1864 with scrimmages off and on during the morning culminating with the battle in the afternoon.
 
 
Camp Life
As you walk around the grounds, feel free to explore our army camps. Our Northern camp can be found at the top of the hill, while our Southern camp is located at the bottom. Feel free to walk through and ask the soldiers and their families about their activities, the latest war news, or what they heard from their families back home. Learn about where soldiers slept, what they ate, how they kept busy, and about the daily routine of a camp. See women cooking and washing clothes for the soldiers. It wasn’t unusual for two armies to be stationed this close to each other, often fighting for weeks over the same bit of ground. You will have to watch the battle to find out who will win this bit of land. The camps are open to the public from 9am to 5pm.
 
 
Children’s Games
What did children in 1860 do for fun? Kids of all ages can learn and play games of the Civil War era. Who knew fun was possible before the invention of the “television” and “video games”. Children’s Games will be taught and played near the battlefield by the root beer stand. Some games will be available for purchase at the Red Rock Mercantile.
 
 
Christian Commission Chaplains
Soon after the start of the Civil War, YMCA leaders became concerned with the religious and spiritual needs of the soldiers in the nearby camps. The general aim of the Commission was to promote the spiritual and temporal welfare of the soldiers.
 
 
Civilian Life
The Civil War exacted a toll on civilians caught in the wake of military and political imperatives. Often the safest place for a young man was in the Army. The safest place for civilians was as far as they could get from the conflict, yet that was often not a possibility for those who loved their land and it was the site of a battle.
 
 
Professor Longley, Amazon Basin explorer, won't be doing a formal presentation, however, he will be happy to tell one and all about his experiences deep in the Amazonian Jungle and his many other adventures regarding his specimens. Professor Longley offers the perspective of a Gentleman Scientist to educate the public on the mid-19th century understanding of the 'Natural Sciences', - with an emphasis on Darwin's and Wallace's theories regarding evolution.
 
 
The Dakota Conflict
Learn how the "War between the States" directly affected Minnesota. Join Vince Botz, from St. Cloud, MN who recently wrote a book called Stearns County and the Dakota War of 1862. Learn about the men from Freeborn and Faribault Counties who mustered the 5th Minnesota Regiment Volunteer Infantry, Company C, who enlisted to “Save the Union” in 1961. From August 18th through September 22, 1862, Minnesota was at war with the Dakota. The 5th Minnesota was sent to quell the uprising. Learn about the causes for this conflict that arose from the Dakota people who were struggling to survive while they watched their culture and lifestyle slowly disappear and how President Lincoln interceded to commute the death sentence for 264 Sioux warriors.
 
 
Dr. Cranium
Ever wonder about your future, your past, or about all those bumps on your head? Visit Dr. Cranium at CWD! By exploring those bumps on your head, he can answer your burning questions and explain the mysteries you always wanted to know, but never knew who to ask. 
 
 
Flags of the Civil War
David Maddex, of Omaha, Nebraska discusses the the significance of battle and unit flags. How come there were so many flags during the war? What did they signify? Were they really that important?
 
 
General Grant
Stop and talk to General Grant about the war and observe as he and the president discuss the war and the plans for the future action. Observe as he receives telegraph messages from his officers in the field.
 
 
Gun Display
Visit the Lodge to see over 200 authentic Civil War Guns and other memorabilia. The display is free and open all day. Don’t be afraid to ask questions.
 
 
 
 
Handiwork
Not just another past time, but a lesson in survival in the 1860’s. Learn about the skills that were required by women to keep their families clothed, warm, and alive.
 
 
History Tent
A history tent will be located at the end of vendor’s row. It will contain pictures and the history of Pipestone’s founding fathers and Civil War Veterans.
 
 
Storyteller Jim Two Crows
National award winner, Jim Two Crows Wallen, is an oral historian who combines his love of history with a good story, keeping you spellbound. For over 25 years, the Missouri native has captured the imaginations of audiences spanning three continents. Two Crows invites you to be submerged in history through his exciting presentations on the Civil War.
 
 
Life in the Civil War
What did children and women do while their fathers, husbands and brothers were at war? Learn about the daily life of women and children: what women had to do to keep her family fed, clothed, and the house clean; how the war affected children at school, at home and at play. Learn about their lives and adversities at the programs on Children’s Life and various programs on the Life of Women.
 
 
Civil War Medicine
Learn about a doctor’s life and the surgery and care given on the battle fields and the hospitals from the company surgeon at the doctor’s office. A Christian Sanitation Commission will be available to discuss the role they played in caring for the wounded.
 
 
Minnesota and the War
Minnesota was an emerging state, having been granted statehood three years prior to the Civil War. Minnesota was the first state to volunteer soldiers to this conflict between the North and the South. This program will provide insight in to life of people in Minnesota and the soldiers were fighting in places most had never heard of or seen.
 
 
Music of the War
Music was a common thread in the 1800's and nothing comes closer to teaching us what life was like in the past than an era’s songs. Music was a vital element in the everyday lives of men and women in the Civil War Era. Music was sung and played at home, at Minstrel and medicine shows, in the camps by the soldiers, performed by regimental bands on the march, and was often played on the battlefield. The more than fifty thousand songs of this era came to express people’s goals and aspirations, their fears, their daily lives, the mood of the nation and their emotional and physical pains.
Ken Nelson and Hartley Alsgaard, songsters will be entertaining at Winchester. They perform songs of the Civil War period, singing and accompanying themselves on guitar and banjo fiddle, mandolin, harmonica, and penny whistle. The songs of the 1860's literally bring history to musical life. You will feel the spirit of the Civil War as they perform the songs of the era and tell the history of the day.
Catherine Grimm of Duluth, MN is currently pursuing her master's degree with an emphasis in American Folk Music, teaching at Duluth Edison Charter Schools as the middle level choir director, and singing with the Arrowhead Chorale. Pipestone Civil War Days first introduced her to American Folk Music, and at the last Civil War Days, to an artillery officer who became her husband. This event will always be her favorite, for many reasons. She will be performing songs from the War as well as discussing their history.
Listen to the 5th Regimental Brass Band in concert Saturday and Sunday and participate in the sing along and dance to their music at the Ball.
 
 
Civil War Nurses
Initially it was considered scandalous for women to experience the horrors that existed in army hospitals. This sense of propriety was dropped as the casualties and injuries began to outnumber the doctors available to treat the wounded. The women offering this service clung to the belief that offering comfort and relieve to another woman’s man, when he was far from would mean another unknown sympathetic woman might offer the same level of care to their own men. Lean more at the Civil War Nurses program. Susie King Taylor, a runaway slave from Georgia and Civil War nurse, was one of the first African American nurses in United States history.
 
 
Photography
Visit the camp photographer at Brady’s Studio and learn about photography during the Civil War. Get your own souvenir photo taken! (subject to availability)
 
 
Dr. Cranium, Phrenologist
Ever wonder about your future, your past, or about all those bumps on your head? Visit Dr. Cranium! By exploring those bumps on your head, he can answer your burning questions and explain the mysteries you always wanted to know, but never knew who to ask.
 
 
Special Postal Cancellation
The United States Postal Service will be on the grounds on Saturday to provide a special postal cancellation opportunity to visitors. Buy Civil War Days postcards at the Red Rock Mercantile and send them to loved ones the same day!
 
 
Quilts and Knitting
Learn about quilting and Civil War quilts and knitting at the Cedar Creek tent. While you are visiting, knit a bandage to help the war effort or start a quilt for a soldier. This year's quilt will feature the English Paper Piecing technique. All ages are encouraged to participate.
 
 
Railroads and the War
Prior to the Civil War railroads were a new and relatively untried invention. However, during the rebellion, railroads came of age. They became both strategic resources, as well as a military target, precisely because they were strategic resources. During the war, soldiers, material and food were routinely transported by rail along with civilians and the raw material necessary to keep the war effort progressing. It was soon realized that the railroads would help to make or break the Union or Confederacy. A model Civil War railroad and presentation will be in the Hiawatha Lodge. Program provided by Dave Yost from Sioux Falls, SD.
 
 
School Time
Experience a school classroom out of the 1860's. Visitors will learn about the educational system during this era and may be surprised at how schools managed during those difficult times. Our school teacher will be instructing all eager pupils out of the McGruffy Reader and Speller. Don't be tardy!
 
 
Men and Women Soldiers
Learn what life was like for the soldiers of the North and the South, and those women who secretly joined. Where They Were Not Supposed to be--Women served as soldiers, laundresses, and cooks during the Civil War. Join us for a survey of the more than 800 women who donned men's clothing to fight for the cause in which they believed.
 
 
Tea Time
What did women do at a formal tea? Stop in and learn and have a cup and a treat.
 
 
What Women Wore
Women's attire in the 1860's was strongly influenced by Queen Victoria of England. These "Victorian" styles could be found in the fashion plates of Godey's magazine and copied by women around the country. This talk will look at the rising fashion ideals, clothing foundation and structure, practical outfits for town and home, and the use of accessories. From petticoats to bonnets, learn about the many layers and the history behind what women wore during the War Between the States.
 
 
Women Spies
Spies in the Civil War were common, but no man ever suspected that women would be a spy. The men did not believe that women had the temperament, the treachery cunning or duplicity to be a spy, but over 100 were. Learn about Women as Spies
 
 
Woodcarving
Woodcarving was a pastime enjoyed by many soldiers. See the woodcarver as he talks about Civil War carvings and the role it played during the War.
 
 
 
 
Faire Wynds Medicine Show and Flea Circus. Photo provided by Barb and Mark Mathwig in 2012.Family portrait taken by Dave Rambow in 2014.Doctor Crainium amazes crowds with his ability to tell your future by reading the bumps on their heads in 2012. Photo provided by Craig Grantz.

 

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